The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge attended UK Holocaust Memorial Day Commemorative Ceremony

Duke and Duchess of Cambridge attended the Holocaust Memorial Day in Westminster

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Today, the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge attended the ceremony to mark Holocaust Memorial Day at Central Hall in Westminster, London. January 27, 2020, marks the 75th anniversary of the liberation of Auschwitz-Birkenau Nazi Camp known as Holocaust Memorial Day.

King Felipe and Queen Letizia attended the commemoration of 75th anniversary of liberation of Auschwitz-Birkenau
Wikipedia

The Holocaust (The Shoah in Hebrew) was the attempt by the Nazis and their collaborators to murder all the Jews in Europe. Holocaust Memorial Day takes place each year on January 27, the anniversary of the liberation of Auschwitz-Birkenau, and honours survivors of the Holocaust, Nazi Persecution, and subsequent genocides in Cambodia, Rwanda, Bosnia and Darfur. From Holocaust Memorial Day Trust,

With the outbreak of World War Two in 1939 Germany invaded Poland, subjecting around two million Polish Jews to violence and forced labour. Thousands of Jews were murdered in the first months of the occupation. Shortly after the occupation Polish Jews were confined to particular neighbourhoods that came to be known as ‘ghettos’. Living conditions in these ghettos were appalling – a deliberate attempt by the Nazis to cause the deaths of hundreds of thousands of Jews. This approach was repeated across Eastern Europe in other countries occupied by the Nazis.

In 1941, the systematic murder of Europe’s Jews began – a plan known by the Nazis as ‘The Final Solution to the Jewish Problem’. Death squads called Einsatzgruppen swept Eastern Europe and the Soviet Union, killing Jews by firing squad. By the end of 1941 the first extermination camp, Chelmno in Poland, had been established, giving the Nazis their method to continue murdering on a giant scale between 1941 and 1945.

By the end of the Holocaust, six million Jewish men, women and children had been murdered in ghettos, mass-shootings, in concentration camps and extermination camps.

Wiener Library/HMD

The Auschwitz concentration camp was a complex of over 40 concentration and extermination camps operated by Nazi Germany in occupied Poland during World War II and the Holocaust.

It consisted of Auschwitz I, the main camp in Oświęcim; Auschwitz II–Birkenau, a concentration and extermination camp built with several gas chambers, Auschwitz III–Monowitz, a labour camp created to staff a factory for the chemical conglomerate IG Farben and dozens of subcamps.

Duke and Duchess of Cambridge attended the Holocaust Memorial Day in Westminster
Royal Family

It is estimated that a minimum of 1.4 million people was deported to Auschwitz between 1940 and 1945, of these, at least 1.1 million were murdered. Some 900,000 Jews were killed in the gas chambers immediately after arriving at the camp and their bodies burned in the crematorium. Approx 30,000 shoes belonging to prisoners who were executed at the camp known as Auschwitz I are part of the Museum exhibition.

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William and Catherine were received by the chief executive of the Holocaust Memorial Day Trust Olivia Marks-Woldman. They also met the survivor and trust honorary president, Sir Ben Helfgott, ahead of the service. Prince William told Olivia and Sir Ben, “We were talking this morning about how you carry on this message for future generations. We will do our best.

Kensington Palace Instagram

Today’s ceremony was organized by the Holocaust Memorail Day Trust that is a Prince of Wales Charles’ patronage. The Holocaust Memorial Day Trust (HMDT) promotes and supports Holocaust Memorial Day (HMD). HMD has taken place in the UK since 2001, with a UK event and over 10,000 local activities taking place on or around the 27th January each year. Each year across the UK, thousands of people come together to learn more about the past, honour the survivors and all those whose lives were changed beyond recognition, and take action to create a safer future. The HMDT works in partnership with many organisations to ensure the life stories of survivors are shared with hundreds of thousands of people.

Kensington Palace

The royal couple was joined by Prime Minister Boris Johnson and leading dignitaries. At the ceremony, Prince William gave a reading that honoured his great-grandmother Princess Alice’s efforts in helping a Jewish family during the Holocaust. The reading was from a letter sent by a friend of his great-grandmother Princess Alice.

Duke and Duchess of Cambridge attended Holocaust Memorial Day Service
Kensington Palace

From People’s report,

“When the persecution of the Jews by the Germans began, Princess Alice asked to be informed about the fate of the Cohen family. Having been informed by friends and by her lady in waiting about the plight of Mrs. Cohen and her young daughter, the Princess decided to offer her hospitality to the two ladies; in fact to hide them in her home despite the danger this entailed,” the letter began.

“The Princess put a small two-room apartment on the third floor at the disposal of Mrs. Cohen and her daughter. It was thanks to the courageous rescue of Princess Alice that the members of the Cohen family were saved.

“The members of the Cohen family left the residence three weeks after liberation, aware that by virtue of the Princess’s generosity and bravery had spared them from the Nazis.

“The great-granddaughter of Rachel Cohen, Evy Cohen, said this 2 years ago: ‘My family would not exist without the courageous act of Princess Alice. Her story of incredible courage must keep being told in her memory. My generation, the past generation and the future generation are, and will eternally be, grateful to Princess Alice for the great act of bravery, risking her own life to take in a family in need.”

 

Duke and Duchess of Cambridge attended the Holocaust Memorial Day in Westminster
HMD

Duke and Duchess of Cambridge along with attendees at the ceremony were the first to see the national exhibition of Memorial Flames made by community groups and organisations across the UK for 75 Memorial Flames project. About Memorial Flames, Holocaust Memorial Day Trust said,

From art groups to faith groups and charities to schools, groups of all kinds have come together to make their own Memorial Flames. Each one commemorates 75 years since the end of the Holocaust, the genocide perpetrated by the Nazis against the Jews in Europe.

In November a panel of experts met to review the artworks submitted, and 75 Memorial Flame artworks have now been selected to form a national exhibition that will be launched at the UK Commemorative Ceremony for HMD 2020. You can see the list of selected groups and some example artworks here.

Duke and Duchess of Cambridge attended the Holocaust Memorial Day in Westminster
HMD

Today’s event is one of the series of events taking place across Europe to mark the solemn anniversary, including at the death camp itself in Poland where Duchess of Cornwall is representing the UK. The survivors shared their experiences and horrors they faced in the camps. People Reported,

Ian Forsyth, who was a wireless operator, told movingly how there were “bodies lying everywhere.” With his voice breaking, he said, “I don’t think anybody who didn’t see the place would understand what it as like. I get emotional when I think of that 11-year-old boy taken away from his mother and sleeping on the top bunk and who died during the night.”

“I hope people can realize how far mankind can sink if they are not careful. We are not all the same but that should be celebrated.”

A short film Nazi Boots created by director Debs Paterson in response to meeting the Holocaust.

Duke and Duchess of Cambridge attended Holocaust Memorial Day Service
Kensington Palace

After the ceremony, William and Catherine also took part in a candle-lighting ceremony on the stage, along with survivors. After 6 candles were lit to honour the 6 million Jews killed by the Nazi, each candle representing 1 million Jews, 75 candles were lit to mark the 75th liberation anniversary. Continuing from People,

Prince Philip‘s late mother, Princess Alice, who set up a nursing home under a monastic Christian sisterhood in Athens, Greece, has been celebrated for her role in helping save a Jewish family during the Holocaust. She is buried Jerusalem and is considered a hero of the Holocaust. Her grandson Prince Charles, 71, spoke of her and his father Philip at a recent palace reception.

“I am immensely proud that my dear grandmother, Princess Alice of Greece, is buried in Jerusalem, on the Mount of Olives,” Charles said. “She is counted one of the Righteous among the Nations for her actions in 1943 when, in Nazi-occupied Athens, she saved a Jewish family by taking them into her home and hiding them.  My grandmother was a formidable lady.”

Duke and Duchess of Cambridge attended Holocaust Memorial Day Service
Kensington Palace

After the event, William and Catherine met with the attendees, Holocaust survivors and their families. From Hello’s report,

William and Kate met 12 survivors of genocide, including those persecuted by the Nazis and others from Cambodia, Bosnia, Rwanda and Darfur after joining them to light the first of 75 candles on stage to represent 75 years since Auschwitz was liberated. “It was so emotional, so many moving stories,” the Duchess told a group, including Mala, who had spoken on stage of her experience of surviving Bergen-Belsen.

“You were fantastic,” she added, putting a hand on Mala’s arm, before asking about how she tells her story to schoolchildren. “Do your experiences resonate with them?” she asked. “Do they feel they can do something for their generation?” “So many families are totally torn apart by the trauma and how that plays out over the generations,” said the Duchess.

Mala, 89, said afterwards: “I said I speak about it in schools and she was asking what impact it has. It brings them closer to the history. “I told her I follow her and her lovely children in the news and she said ‘I have told the children’. They have made them aware of it (the Holocaust). I suppose she tells it in the measure that it’s applicable to that age.” Mala said of the ceremony: “I found it very emotional. The reason I am able to speak about it all is that I’m able to control my emotions, but lately it has become more difficult. It [the music] went right into my bones.”

Kensington Palace

Duchess of Cambridge shares a joke with Holocaust survivor Yvonne Bernstein after the UK Holocaust Memorial Day.  Yvonne Bernstein is one of the survivors Catherine photographed yesterday. Continuing from Hello!

Meanwhile William spoke to a group including Daniela Abraham, a Roma activist who had been overcome by emotion after speaking on stage about how her relatives were murdered by the Nazis. “You spoke very well,” he told her. “Thank you so much.” Kate told the same group: “It’s so humbling to hear the gratitude from people, despite what you have gone through. It’s heartbreaking to hear.” Manfred Goldberg, 89, a survivor of the Stutthof camp, told the Duchess people found it hard to comprehend how six million Jewish people were killed. “When you hear the stories of an individual it becomes easier to understand this better. And it has taken a while for everybody to be able to speak,” said Kate. “It’s hard to stand up there and do that. “I’m really interested in intergenerational trauma and how it affects a family. It’s so important.”

Duchess of Cambridge phogoraphed the holocaust Survivors
Kensington Palace

Yesterday, Kensington Palace released two portraits of Holocaust Survivors taken by the Duchess as part of the project of pictures of the survivors marking the 75th Anniversary.

A video of today’s event.

The today’s event reminded us the horrors of the past and tells us how a human mind can be source of brutal killing of humanity. It is our responsibilities to make sure that the coming generation must be aware of the past horrors so that they must not be repeated ever. You can read all about the Holocaust here.


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The Duchess of Cambridge Photographed Holocaust Survivors

Duchess of Cambridge phogoraphed the holocaust Survivors

Kensington Palace

Ahead of 75th Anniversary of the Liberation of Auschwitz, the Duchess of Cambridge became the part of a very special project to mark the Holocaust Memorial Day. Yesterday, Kensington Palace released two moving portraits taken by Duchess of Cambridge that features Two Holocaust survivors – Steven Frank BEM and Yvonne Bernstein.

Duchess of Cambridge phogoraphed the holocaust Survivors
Kensington Palace

The project that came alive with a collaboration of Holocaust Memorial Trust UK, Jewish Newspaper and The Royal Photography Society, aims to honour the victims of the Holocaust and to celebrate the full lives that survivors have built in the UK. The photographs will form part of an exhibition opening later this year, bringing together 75 powerful images of survivors and their family members to mark 75 years since the end of the Holocaust. Today 4 portraits in total were released. About the project Holocaust Memorial trust Said,

We are pleased to have worked in partnership with Jewish News and the Royal Photographic Society (RPS) on this exciting project. The project aims to honour the victims of the Holocaust and to celebrate the full lives that survivors have built in the UK, and was originally conceived by Justin Cohen of the Jewish News.

Each of the portraits depicts the special connection between a survivor and younger generations of their family, who over the coming years will carry the legacy of their grandparents. However, the project also aims to inspire people across the UK to consider their own responsibility to remember and share the stories of those who endured persecution at the hands of the Nazis.

Olivia Marks-Woldman, Chief Executive of the Holocaust Memorial Day Trust, said of the project: ‘We are so pleased to be part of this project, as people from across the UK come together to mark Holocaust Memorial Day. The exhibition will be a fitting way to mark 75 years since the world was left scarred by the Holocaust. The survivors featured in these portraits all have very different stories, but each of their lives has been fundamentally changed by the trauma and loss they experienced. What connects these individuals is that, after systematic persecution, they all made the UK their home and the country has been enriched by them and their families.

Duchess of Cambridge phogoraphed the holocaust Survivors
Kensington Palace

Each portrait depicts the special connection between a survivor and younger generations of their family, who will carry the legacy of their grandparents in the coming years. About the project and her experience of photographing the survivors, Duchess said,

“The harrowing atrocities of the Holocaust, which were caused by the most unthinkable evil, will forever lay heavy in our hearts. Yet it is so often through the most unimaginable adversity that the most remarkable people flourish. Despite unbelievable trauma at the start of their lives, Yvonne Bernstein and Steven Frank are two of the most life-affirming people that I have had the privilege to meet. They look back on their experiences with sadness but also with gratitude that they were some of the lucky few to make it through. Their stories will stay with me forever.”

The Duchess of Cambridge took an image of Steven Frank BEM, now 84, who was originally from Amsterdam survived multiple concentration camps as a child. He was joined by his two granddaughters Trixie and Maggie in the picture.

Duchess of Cambridge phogoraphed the holocaust Survivors
Kensington Palace

Steven and his grandchildren included meaningful items in the portraits – including a pan that his mother kept with them throughout their time in the camps and tomatoes from his garden. When Steven was in the Theresienstadt camp as a child, he helped another prisoner grow tomatoes.  About this pictures Steven said,

I would hope that the people who look at these pictures not only look at the beauty of the photography, but they will also think of the people and their families that they lost in the Holocaust.

Steven was sent to Westerbork transit camp and then on to Theresienstadt. Steven and his brothers were 3 of only 93 children who survived the camp, out of 15,000 children sent there.

Kensington Palace

The Duchess also photographed a German survivor Yvonne Bernstein with her granddaughter Chloe. Yvonne was hidden as a child in France, travelling in the care of her aunt and uncle, frequently changing homes and names. Yvonne holds her ID card from Germany, dated 3 March 1939. It has the letter ‘J’ stamped on it – one of the many ways Jewish people were singled out and separated from the rest of the population.

Kensington Palace

The whole project was proposed by Justin Cohen, who shared how this whole idea became a reality on a post he wrote for Jewish Newspaper. Read the full text here.

Having approached the Palace six months ago with the seeds of an idea for a photography project involving the Duchess to mark 75 years since the liberation of Auschwitz, I was delighted (not to mention surprised given the weight of requests the Royals receive) to receive a call asking for more details. Further calls followed and it wasn’t long before Palace aides suggested bringing in the Royal Photographic Society, where she is a patron, to help make my vision of 75 images a reality, and involving the families of survivors to highlight their fortitude in building full lives after the horrors.

But I didn’t dare believe this project would happen until I learnt how much time and thought the Duchess was personally putting into it. The fine art graduate spent several days researching what she could bring to the table in order to best capture these individuals for the future. She was at pains to ensure the survivors were comfortable with the vision and that the spotlight was on the heroes to be pictured and not the Duchess herself. The idea of an exhibition bringing together all 75 images – most of which will be taken over the coming months by fellows of the RPS – followed.

Last month, the Holocaust Memorial Day Trust came on board to support the initiative and spoke in strict confidence to survivors to be photographed both by The Duchess and by RPS. We are also honoured to reveal the first cohort of these images today. Before meeting Steven Frank and Yvonne Bernstein, The Duchess spent significant time preparing for the photography session, and once they had arrived she spent nearly two and a half hours with them, getting to know them and their stories, and taking their photographs. Why give you all this background? It’s crucial because it shows that our Royal Family are determined to follow up oft-repeated words of remembrance with practical steps as, day by day, we bid farewell to more survivors. It shows they are personally ready to take on the message of the survivor generation to challenge all forms of hatred wherever it rears its ugly head. As the Duchess and Prince William wrote in the visitor’s book at Stutthof concentration camp two years ago: “All of us have an overwhelming responsibility to make sure that we learn the lessons and that the horror of what happened is never forgotten and never repeated.” In other words, the message is about the here and now at least as much as about the past.

Duchess of Cambridge phogoraphed the holocaust Survivors
Kensington Palace

Palace also released some behind the scene pictures when Catherine met with the survivors.  Photographs were taken at Kensington Palace earlier this month, and because both survivors have strong links to the Netherlands, Catherine was inspired by 17th-century Dutch painter Johannes Vermeer, who specialised in interior domestic scenes. The pictures were taken next to a window that brought in light from the east, the direction of Jerusalem. Duchess of Cambridge continued,

While I have been lucky enough to meet two of the now very few survivors, I recognise not everyone in the future will be able to hear these stories first hand. It is vital that their memories are preserved and passed on to future generations so that what they went through will never be forgotten. I recall reading the Diary of Anne Frank as a young girl. Her sensitive and intimate interpretation of the horrors of the time was one of the underlying inspirations behind the images. I wanted to make the portraits deeply personal to Yvonne and Steven – a celebration of family and the life that they have built since they both arrived in Britain in the 1940s.

The other two portraits include a picture of John Hajdu, who survived the Budapest Ghetto, with his grandson Zac taken by South African photographer Jillian Edelstein. John said, “When I give my talks I show family photos because I think it’s so important for them to see us as human beings, especially if they have just seen images of people in camps. I think the fact that the exhibition will include so many different experiences is so important – it will give a much broader idea of what it was like during the Holocaust rather than just hearing from one survivor.”

Duchess of Cambridge phogoraphed the holocaust Survivors
Holocaust Memorial Trust

While Joan Salter with her husband Martin and daughter Shelley were photographed by a Swiss photographer Frederic Aranda.

Duchess of Cambridge phogoraphed the holocaust Survivors
Holocaust Memorial Trust

You might remember that Duke and Duchess of Cambridge met with Holocaust survivors during their Poland tour in July 2017. The couple visited Stutthof – that was amongst the worst in the Nazi concentration camps causing the deaths of tens of thousands.

Duke and Duchess started Day 2 in Poland with a moving visit to Stutthof
KensingtonRoyal

That day, William and Catherine met two survivors Zigi Shipper and Manfred Goldberg who shared their harrowing stories. Thanking the Survivors, Catherine said “What you have been through and you still hold in your memories must be extremely difficult to speak about. Thank you very much for meeting us.”

On Monday, the Duke and Duchess will attend the UK Holocaust Memorial Day Commemorative Ceremony in Westminster.


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Duchess of Cambridge on 24 Hour tour of the Country to launch 5 Big Questions

Duchess of Cambridge arrived in Cardiff to launch 5 Big Questions Survey

Duchess of Cambridge arrived in Cardiff to launch 5 Big Questions Survey
Kensington Palace

Yesterday, Duchess of Cambridge launched a landmark survey ‘5 Big Questions’ under Fives for her dream project Early Years Intervention. Today to promote the survey, Catherine was undertaking a whirlwind tour of the country to meet parents and families.

Duchess of Cambridge arrived in Cardiff to launch 5 Big Questions Survey
Heads Together

Initially, the plan was to join parents at LEYF Nursery in Southwark, London then travels to Cardiff to attend a baby sensory class at Ely and Careau Children’s Centre and the last stop of the day was Surrey. But due to the weather conditions, her London engagement was cancelled.

Duchess of Cambridge arrived in Cardiff to launch 5 Big Questions Survey
Rebecca English

The Survey gives people across the UK an opportunity to provide their view on raising the next generation. For the first part of the day, Duchess of Cambridge travelled to Cardiff where she visited Ely and Careau Children’s Centre and attended a baby sensory class.

Duchess of Cambridge arrived in Cardiff to launch 5 Big Questions Survey
Heads Together

The centre provides support services to children and their families and helps youngsters with special needs in addition to offering adult education, parenting support and community education teams. Open access play, breakfast, after-school activities and holiday clubs are also housed in the centre, as well as health visitors, speech and language therapists and partners such as Sure Start and Language and Play.

Duchess of Cambridge arrived in Cardiff to launch 5 Big Questions Survey
Kensington Palace

From People’s report,

“I see amazing work you’re doing here in so many areas,” she told workers at the center. “It’s just bringing it to light. The critical work you’re doing has a massive social — and economic — impact later down the years.”

Duchess of Cambridge arrived in Cardiff to launch 5 Big Questions Survey
Heads Together

From Daily Mail’s report,

She spoke about her experience of being ‘isolated’ as a first-time mother, as she recalled living in Anglesey in North Wales when Prince George was a ‘tiny baby’ and William was a RAF Search and Rescue helicopter pilot.

While visiting the children’s centre, Kate told a group: ‘I had a tiny, tiny baby in the middle of Anglesey it was so isolated, so cut off. I didn’t have any family around and he was doing night shifts. So…if only I had had a center like this.’

Duchess of Cambridge arrived in Cardiff to launch 5 Big Questions Survey
Heads Together

A beautiful shot of Catherine playing with kids. More from People’s Report,

Earlier, she met little River Rowson, 3, who was playing greengrocers with some pals. He was showing her some Brussels Sprouts and Broccoli. “Are you cooking too?” she asked as he offered some vegetables. “Are you going to make a stir fry?”
River clearly liked his new pal. “You’re my friend,” he told her, to which Kate replied, “You’re my friend too.

A video of the Cardiff visit.

Duchess of Cambridge visited HM Surrey Prison to launch landmark survey
Kensington Palace

After Cardiff, Catherine travelled to HM Prison Send in Surrey to undertake the second part of today’s engagements. The location of the visit was kept under the wrap until the visit due to the security reasons.

Embed from Getty Images

You might remember Catherine’s last visit to the prison in 2015 in relation to her work on Addiction. In 2015 after her visit, Duchess had said, “I was reminded today how addictions lie at the heart of so many social issues and how substance misuse can play such destructive role in vulnerable people’s lives. I saw again today that a failure to intervene early in life to tackle mental health problems and other challenges can have profound consequences for people throughout their lives. I am grateful to the women I met for sharing their difficult personal stories with me. It is encouraging to learn how organisations like RAPt are offering specialist support to help people break the cycle of addiction and look forward to a positive and crime-free life.”

Duchess of Cambridge visited HM Surrey Prison to launch landmark survey
Kensington Palace

Today, Duchess met with some of the old inmates she met in 2015 and discussed how they have since been successfully rehabilitated, released and are rebuilding their families in addition to women currently at the prison. During the visit, Catherine learned about The Forward Trust.

Duchess of Cambridge visited HM Surrey Prison to launch landmark survey
Kensington Palace

The Forward Trust helps people to break the often interlinked cycles of crime and addiction to move forward with their lives. Forward is one of the largest providers of intensive, abstinence-based addiction services in the UK, working across the country to empower people to break the often interlinked cycles of addiction or crime and move forward with their lives. The programme Forward delivers in HMP Send is the only intensive 12-step prison-based drug and alcohol programme for women in the UK. Duchess heard about the work Trust do at the prison in supporting clients to improve their relationships with friends and family, including reconnecting with children. From The Forward Trust,

One of the women the The Duchess was reunited with was Kirsty Day, who she first met in 2015. Kirsty spent her childhood in and out of the care system. Following a series of adverse experiences, she turned to substance misuse and began a 10-year cycle of addiction and re-offending.

Kirsty said: “In my teenage years, I experienced a series of loss, hurt and abuse. From this moment on, I entered a downward spiral of addiction and prison.

“While serving my sentence, I woke up one day and realised enough was enough. I took myself to my drug and alcohol worker and asked for help. I was lucky enough to be sent to HMP Send for a fresh start.

“The programme changed my life. In some of my darkest moments since, I have never turned back to drugs.”

Five years on from the Duchess’s last visit, Kirsty has married, been promoted at The Nelson Trust and even been shortlisted as a nominee at the National Diversity Awards, recognising her work in helping women recover from addiction and trauma.

Duchess of Cambridge visited HM Surrey Prison to launch landmark survey
Kensington Palace

From Daily Mail’s report,

she told a group at the prison who have since been released from custody: ‘It really shocked me when I came here last time how early the challenges were that you face. How early you could take it back.’

One Send inmate described their time in prison as one of the best things that had happened to them, crediting the support of Forward Trust programmes. On hearing that, the duchess commented: ‘It’s so often I hear that, why does it have to get to that point before people receive the help and support?’

Returning to the impact early years experiences can have in people, Kate said: ‘I’m hugely passionate about trying to really help get into this crisis, trying to help provide that prevention mechanism and that support system in our communities. Particularly that support in the early years of life.’

A video of the visit.

Kensington Palace

For the day, Catherine premiered a new look.

Duchess of Cambridge wore Massimo Dutti Limited Edition Button Cashmere Wool Camel Coat to Cardiff
Massimo Dutti Limited Edition Button Cashmere Wool Camel Coat

She was wearing a camel colour Massimo Dutti Coat. Thanks to Caroline Parr for the id. The £349 Limited Edition Button Cashmere Wool Camel Coat is described as, “Classic, sophisticated and with a flattering silhouette for the feminine figure, this camel-coloured coat made of natural fibres will be an essential piece this season. Tailored coat made of wool and cashmere. Featuring a slim fit, peak lapels, double-breasted button fastening, two flap pockets, long sleeves with four-button cuffs, a back vent and lining.” Currently, it is on sale for £149.

Duchess of Cambridge arrived in Cardiff to launch 5 Big Questions Survey
Rebecca English

Underneath the coat, Duchess of Cambridge was wearing a black knitted top and Animal print Zara Skirt. Thanks to Caroline Parr for the id.

Duchess of Cambridge wore Zara Animal Print Skirt to Cardiff
Zara Animal Print Skirt

The brown coloured skirt was described as, “Flowing midi skirt with a combined faux leather waistband. Fastening on the side with an invisible zip and snap button”. The skirt was original£29.99 before going on sale for £9.99 and selling out.

Duchess of Cambridge wore Ralph Lauren Collection Black Suede High Heel Boot to Cardiff
Ralph Lauren Collection Black Suede High Heel Boot

Catherine paired the look with her Ralph Lauren Collection Black Suede High Heel Boot.

Duchess of Cambridge UFO Gold Fringe Earrings
UFO Gold Fringe Earrings

Duchess finished her look with UFO Gold Fringe Earrings.

Duchess of Cambridge wore Daniella Draper Personalised Gold Midnight Moon Necklace to cardiff
Daniella Draper Personalised Gold Midnight Moon Necklace

Another new element in her look was Daniella Draper Personalised Gold Midnight Moon Necklace.  Thanks to MiddletonMaven on Twitter for the id. Catherine’s pendant was engraved with G, C and L – the first letter of her kids’ name. The £1070 necklace is described as, “Personalise this beautiful 9ct Gold Moon and sparkly diamond charm with your name, partners name, or simply a word that means something to you for an extra special touch. The moon is universally representing the rhythm of time as it embodies the cycle. The phases of the moon symbolise immortality, eternity and enlightenment.”

Duchess of Cambridge visited HM Surrey Prison to launch landmark survey
Kensington Palace

Next, we will see Duchess of Cambridge on Monday, January 27th when she will attend the UK Holocaust Memorial Day Commemorative Ceremony in Westminster with Prince William.


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