Duchess of Cambridge in Elegant Green for Badshahi Mosque Visit

Duke and Duchess of Cambridge visited Iconic Badshahi Mosque in Lahore Pakista
Duke and Duchess of Cambridge visited Iconic Badshahi Mosque in Lahore Pakista
Kensington Palace Twitter

The Day 4 of Royal Visit Pakistan ended with two iconic visits. After visiting SOS Village and National Cricket Academy, Duke and Duchess had a quick outfit change and headed to Badshahi Mosque. They were received by Imam Abdul Kabir Azad and the Honorary Consul, UK Fakir Aijaz Uddin.

Duke and Duchess of Cambridge visited Iconic Badshahi Mosque in Lahore Pakista
Chris Ship on Twitter

The royal couple toured the iconic mosque and attended an inter-faith meeting to understand how they are promoting interfaith harmony within their communities.

Duke and Duchess of Cambridge visited Badshahi Mosque in Lahore during their royal visit pakistan
Wikipedia

Badshahi Mosque is the most iconic Islamic site in Lahore, set in the heart of the Walled City. The mosque is renown for the carved marble and elaborate plasterwork that are used throughout the mosque’s interior.

Duke and Duchess of Cambridge visited Badshahi Mosque in Lahore during their royal visit pakistan
Wikipedia

Built by the Mughal Emperor Aurangzeb in 1671 the mosque is an important example of Mughal architecture, with an exterior that is decorated with carved red sandstone with marble inlay.

Duke and Duchess of Cambridge visited Iconic Badshahi Mosque in Lahore Pakista
Kensington Palace

It remains the largest mosque of the Mughal-era and is the second-largest mosque in Pakistan.

Kensington Palace

During the visit, William and Catherine were given a brief history of the building before they sat down for a Prayer from the Holy Quran in Arabic.

Kensington Palace

The couple was joined by Sarfaraz Peters – the moderator of the Church of Pakistan and the Bishop of Peshawar, Azahar Ali Abidi – a Shi’a academic, Ramesh Singh – a member of the Pakistan Sikh Gurdwara Prabandhak Committee, Dr Ramesh Kumar – Patron in Chief of the Pakistan Hindu Council and Dr Ayesha Leghari – a Suni Muslim scholar.

Duke and Duchess of Cambridge visited Iconic Badshahi Mosque in Lahore Pakista
Kensington Palace

A beautiful picture of William and Catherine during the meeting. From Daily Mail’s report,

Dr Ayesha Leghari said afterwards that the couple had been ‘interested and empathetic listeners’, saying: ‘You have people who are interested listeners and people who are also empathetic and they were very empathetic. We were really pleased. They were very responsive and very charming.’

When they left they were told by Honorary Consul, UK Fakir Aijaz Uddin, ‘If there’s one word to describe your visit it is ‘joy.’ You have radiated joy wherever you have been .’ And the duke said, ‘We are very happy people.’

Duke and Duchess of Cambridge visited Shaukat Khanum Hospital in Lahore
Shaukat Khanum Hospital

The last stop of the day was a bit emotional moment for Prince William. They visited the famous Shaukat Khanum hospital – a state-of-the-art cancer facility located in the centre of the city.

Embed from Getty Images

William’s mother, Diana Princess of Wales, visited Pakistan on two occasions specifically for the hospital-  in 1996  to raise funds for the hospital and 1997 to inaugurate the hospital. Shaukat Khanum Memorial Cancer Hospital and Research Centre is Pakistan’s largest tertiary care cancer hospital.

Duke and Duchess of Cambridge visited Shaukat Khanam Hospital in Pakistan
Shaukat Khanam Hospital

Built by Pakistani cricketer-turned-politician and current Prime Minister Imran Khan,  the hospital came into life after his mother Mrs Shaukat Khanum succumbed to cancer in 1985. During his mother’s illness, he also witnessed the plight of poor cancer patients in Pakistan’s hospitals, and deeply felt the need for a specialized cancer centre in his country.

Duke and Duchess of Cambridge visited Shaukat Khanum Hospital in Lahore
Shaukat Khanum Hospital

At the hospital, the royal couple toured the children’s ward and spend time with patients undergoing treatment at the hospital and spoke to their families.

Duke and Duchess of Cambridge visited Shaukat Khanum Hospital in Lahore
Shaukat Khanum Hospital

In the children’s ward, the royal couple met Wafia Rehmani, a seven-year-old girl from over the border in Afghanistan, who has a kidney tumour. Wafia presented a matching toy tiara to the Duchess and hosted a toy tea party on her bed. Wafia wants to be a doctor. She showed William and Catherine her toy medical set.  From People’s report,

Her father calls her ‘princess,’ and she likes to wear a crown. Now she is looking forward to meeting a real princess,” her brother, Hedyatullah Rehmani, said as they waited for the couple to arrive at the children’s chemotherapy ward.

Duke and Duchess of Cambridge visited Shaukat Khanum Hospital in Lahore
Kensington Palace

This tiara donned tea party actually beat all the dazzling tiaras of royal jewel vault. Catherine fulfilled the little girl’s wish and it was such a precious and emotional moment to see.

Duke and Duchess of Cambridge visited Shaukat Khanum Hospital in Lahore
Shaukat Khanum Hospital

Duke and Duchess also played with 5-year-old Muhammad Samir in the chemotherapy ward of the hospital. Samir is being treated for Hodgkins Lymphoma. Prince William played with the little boy’s fishing game as the pair competed to hook fish.

Duke and Duchess of Cambridge visited Shaukat Khanum Hospital in Lahore
Shaukat Khanum Hospital

Duke and Duchess talked to the patients family members.

When William’s mother Diana visited the children’s cancer hospital in Lahore in 1996 & 1997, she was shown around by Dr Aasim Yusuf who was also on duty today to show the royal couple around.

Duke and Duchess of Cambridge visited Shaukat Khanum Hospital in Lahore

Dr Yusuf very generously shared some of the pictures from Lady Diana’s visit.  Continuing from People’s report,

Recalling Princess Diana’s visits, Yusuf said: “We were all struck by how friendly she was. How she was able to put everyone at ease. We were all very nervous about what we should say and what she would ask and how we should address her. The minute she came into the room, she lit up the room obviously and also she was just so friendly and down to earth. You could tell that she was genuinely interested in the people she was meeting.”

Now showing her son around made him feel “a lot older”, Yusuf joked. “It’s a great honor and a privilege for us to be welcoming Prince William and the Duchess of Cambridge today. It’s a special honor that they have chosen to come and see our hospital again.”

Coming to Duchess’ second look of the day. I personally like her this look the most out of all the traditional looks she had donned so far during the Pakistan tour.

Duchess of Cambridge wore Maheen Khan turquoise and gold Shalwar Kameez to visit Badshahi Mosque in Lahore
Kensington Palace/Maheen Khan turquoise and gold Shalwar Kameez

Duchess wore a really elegant bespoke turquoise and gold French-Chiffon Shalwar Kameez and matching headscarf by Maheen Khan. Known as Pakistan’s Coco Chanel, Maheen Khan was discovered by Duchess’ stylist at O’Nitta in London who is the exclusive stockist of Pakistani’ designer in the UK.

Duchess of Cambridge wore Maheen Khan turquoise and gold Shalwar Kameez
Kensington Palace

A closer look at the outfit. The Kameez features silk gold thread Swarth phulkari embroidery on its front and matching details on the sleeves and dupatta.

Duchess of Cambridge wore Maheen Khan Turquoise French chiffon with silk gold thread Swarth embroidery in Lahore
Maheen Khan Turquoise French chiffon with silk gold thread Swarth embroidery

Monique Jessen from People reported,

Walking barefoot into the Badshahi mosque in Lahore on Thursday with Prince William, Kate wore a handcrafted teal and gold outfit by local designer Maheen Khan, an off-the-rack piece purchased at O’nitaa, a boutique in London’s Chelsea neighborhood.

“It couldn’t be more perfect!” Onita Prasada, the store owner, tells PEOPLE. “The whole thing just frames her body so beautifully. I love the way she wore the scarf, and the silk gold thread edging just reflects off her face so beautifully.”

Made from French chiffon, the shalwar kameez is hand embroidered in gold-colored silk by the tribespeople of Swarth in Pakistan. Worn with a bespoke scarf, or dupatta as it is locally known, the designer made it especially for Kate, to exactly match the outfit purchased from O’nitaa.

“Normally this would take about three months to make because of all the intricate embroidery,” explains Prasada.

 

Duchess of Cambridge wore Catherine Zoraida Gold Fern Hoop Earrings
Catherine Zoraida Gold Fern Hoop Earrings

Catherine paired her look with Catherine Zoraida Gold Fern Hoop Earrings.

Duke and Duchess of Cambridge visited Iconic Badshahi Mosque in Lahore Pakistan
The Royal Family Twitter

After the busy day in Lahore, William and Catherine along with their team and royal press pack were supposed to be in Islamabad by evening. But due to the adverse weather conditions, the pilot of the RAF Voyager could not land the aircraft even after two tries.  So the aircraft headed back to Lahore where the royals and company will be spending a night. About the incident the Telegraph reported,

The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge had their RAF Voyager plane diverted during the fourth day of their Pakistan tour as the flight was buffeted by an electrical storm.

The Royal couple and their entourage of aides, diplomats and press were jolted by heavy turbulence as the aircraft returned from a day in Lahore.

The pilot spent an hour circling the capital, Islamabad, and twice failed to land because of the storm.

A decision was eventually made to return to Lahore, where the couple had spent the day visiting a cricketing academy, historic mosque and cancer hospital.

Back on the tarmac in the city, the Duke walked through the plane to see if the press were fine and joked that he had been flying the plane. The duke is a former air ambulance pilot.

From Daily Mail about the incident:

‘The Duke’s immediate reaction was that nobody was being left behind, we were all in it together. He was adamant about that,’ a source said.

The mid-air drama occurred yesterday evening as their RAF Voyager plane attempted to land in the capital Islamabad.

In all the airbus was in the air for more than two hours in total, either circling or trying to land through the ‘serious storm’, with passengers describing the flight as a ‘rollercoaster’.

‘It’s the worse turbulence I have ever encountered,’ said one of the experience, which saw passengers lifted off their seats and others experience severe nausea.

William, who went to check on travelling media, made a reference to his time as an air ambulance pilot, joking: ‘I was flying!’

One passenger said it was a ‘pretty serious storm’, describing the flight as a ‘rollercoaster’.

Another said: ‘It was pretty hairy at times.

‘The plane was making large jerking movements as we tried to battle through the wind. It was a relief to land safely in Lahore.’

Lightening could be seen flashing violently around the right-side of the plane as the pilot did his best to land both at the main international airport in Islamabad and then the Pakistan Air Force Base Nur Khan, Rawalpindi.

But in the end he was forced to announce that the aircraft would be returning to its departure airport to refuel and allow senior High Commission staff, police and royal aides what step to take next.

After landing, William, who asked travelling media how the were feeling and even joked: ‘I was flying!’ The duke is a former air ambulance pilot.

The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge have been flying around Pakistan each day on the British Government’s official Voyager aircraft, courtesy of the Royal Air Force.

Tomorrow is the last day of the visit and so far we do not have any indication whether any engagement is scheduled for Friday or not. Duke and Duchess are scheduled to arrive back in the UK by afternoon.  I will leave you with this stunning picture of Catherine from Mosque visit.

Duchess of Cambridge wore Maheen Khan turquoise and gold Shalwar Kameez
Kensington Palace

 

 

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Duke and Duchess of Cambridge headed to Chitral on Day 3 of Pakistan Visit

Duke and Duchess of Cambridge visited Hindu Kush region in Chitral during Pakistan visit1

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After a glamorous appearance at the reception last night, today the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge were all set for another busy day in Pakistan. The couple headed to the northwestern region of the country – Chitral. They visited the Hindu Kush region, near the Afghan border.

Duke and Duchess of Cambridge visited Hindu Kush region in Chitral during Pakistan visit1
Kensington Royal Pakistan

As expected the itinerary was released in the early hours of Pakistan time. Chitral is the capital of the Chitral District, situated on the Chitral River in northern Khyber Pakhtunkhwa, Pakistan. The royal couple is visiting the foothills of the Hindu Kush mountain range to witness the devastating effects of global warming and climate change – one of William’s focus area as senior royal.

Duke and Duchess of Cambridge visited Hidu Kush region in Chitral during Pakistan visit
Wikipedia

The Hindu Kush region is an 800-kilometre-long (500 mi) mountain range that stretches through Afghanistan, from its centre to northern Pakistan and into Tajikistan and China – home to 250 million people. The mountainous region, which runs from Afghanistan to Myanmar, has been dubbed the “third pole” of the earth because it has more ice than anywhere outside the Arctic and Antarctica. Mount Tirich Mir is the highest peak, rising near the Pakistan-Afghanistan border to 25,230ft.

Duke and Duchess of Cambridge visited Hindu Kush region in Chitral during Pakistan visit1
The Royal Family

The range has great historical significance, in that invaders from Central Asia brought their Indo-European language through the high passes in around 1500 BC. The mountains have also provided access to the northern plains of India for such conquerors such as Alexander the Great and Genghis Khan. The name derives from the Arabic for “Mountains of India’.

The Royal Family

William and Catherine wanted to highlight modern Pakistan and it’s culture and Chitral is one of the most suitable selection. In the region alone 14 languages are spoken given the ethnic diversity of the region.

Upon arrival in Chitral, William and Catherine were welcomed with several presents from Himalayan dignitaries. They were gifted traditional Chitrali hats. William received embroidered coat and Duchess was presented with a warm shawl, that Catherine immediately tried on.

The Daily Mail‘s royal correspondent, Rebecca English, tweeted, “Today William and Kate have flown north to see for themselves some of the beauty of the country but also the effects of climate change on glacial regions,”.

 

Before heading to visit the Chiatibo Glacier in Broghil National Park, William received a very special gift  – a book commemorating Princess Diana’s visit to the country in 1991. He looked through the pages and said “The same hat” while Duchess described it as “very special”.

Duke and Duchess of Cambridge visited Hidu Kush region in Chitral during Pakistan visit

Diana visited the same place in 1991 and was also presented with a similar regimental cap of the Chitral Scouts regiment of Pakistan army William and Catherine received today. Usually, the cap is worn by the men but exception VIP Women guest is also presented with the cap when they visit the region.

Duke and Duchess of Cambridge visited Hindu Kush region in Chitral during Pakistan visit1
Kensington Palace

During their time in Chitral, William and Catherine walked around the Chiatibo glacier’s northern tip in Broghil National Park seeing a melting glacier in person for the first time. They learned more from The glacier expert Furrukh Bashir about how climate change is impacting the glacial landscapes. The couple specifically asked for the visit and Palaced addressed it as “the very real consequences of global warming”.

Duke and Duchess of Cambridge visited Hindu Kush region in Chitral during Pakistan visit1
Kensington Palace

In the mountains of Northern Pakistan, the stark effects of climate change and global warming are having a profound impact on the communities that call the region home. Here, The Duke and Duchess visited several inspiring community-led initiatives that aim to equip local society with the tools they need to adjust to the changing landscape and weather patterns of the area and the environmental challenges which are affecting their traditional way of life.

Duke and Duchess of Cambridge visited Hindu Kush region in Chitral during Pakistan visit1
Kensington Palace

William talked to the media at the glacier, “Catherine and I felt it was very important to come to Pakistan and see the different range of environments there are and, and really try and get a feel of the country. But also to use our voice and lend our position and our visit to kind of talk about issues like climate change, issues about the environment. We’ve seen all around the world now, the young are getting very engaged in what’s going on.”

A video of the visit.

Kensington Palace

They visited a site affected by a devastating flood in 2015 to See the impact of flash flooding caused by the melting glacier on local villages in Chitral Valley.  The Duke and Duchess saw buildings and farmland destroyed in the severe floods of 2015.

Duke and Duchess of Cambridge visited Hindu Kush region in Chitral during Pakistan visit1
Kensington Palace Instagram

Some 1.65 billion people are thought to rely on the rivers that flow from the peaks into countries which also include India and China. A report in February this year revealed that at least a third of the glacier range in the Himalayas are expected to have melted by 2100 even if carbon emissions are dramatically cut. The flash floods are causing real damage to the villages and farmlands threatening the livelihoods of the residents.

Duke and Duchess of Cambridge visited Hindu Kush region in Chitral during Pakistan visit1
Kensington Palace

For ITV’s report,

At a time when, across the UK, protesters from Extinction Rebellion are demanding more action to combat climate change – here is a very real example of what planetary warming is doing. These are rural people who are doing very little to cause climate change – but they are suffering from its consequences.

A flash flood in 2015 caused severe damage in the remote valleys of the Chitral region – so William and Kate will see how the villagers are having to change their way of life to prevent people being killed by the floods.

In the West, we have focused a lot on the terrorism which has plagued Pakistan for many years.

Last night, Prince William paid his respects to all those who had “endured such sacrifice” but he also spoke of the alarming impact of temperature increases in “northern Pakistan’s highest mountains.”

“This could lead to a loss of over a third of these vital glaciers in less than a century,” William warned in a speech.

He spoke of the threats to a “critical water store for a quarter of a billion people” and the impact that will have on farming and electricity generation.

Duke and Duchess of Cambridge visited Hindu Kush region in Chitral during Pakistan visit1
Kensington Palace

William and Catherine heard from local people affected by these floods, who explained how they are adapting their ways of life in response to flooding and other challenges posed by climate change.

Duke and Duchess of Cambridge visited Hindu Kush region in Chitral during Pakistan visit1
Kensington Palace Instagram

The royal couple watched a drill conducted by volunteers from the local emergency response team. The team is supported by UK aid and was instrumental in preventing loss of life in 2015.  They also saw a drill by a local Search and Rescue Team, who demonstrated their ability to evacuate casualties across a river.

Kensington Palace

In the area, William met a lady who was named after his mother Diana and then she named her son after his name William.  Diana’s grandmother came to see Princess Diana during her visit to the region in 1991 when she had a granddaughter she was named after the Princess of Wales.

Duke and Duchess of Cambridge visited Hindu Kush region in Chitral during Pakistan visit1
Kensington Palace

The last stop of the day was a settlement of the Kalash people to “learn about their community, unique heritage and traditions”. William and Catherine joined children and young people from the tribe in the village square and heard how the Kalash coexist alongside the other communities that call the region home.

Duke and Duchess of Cambridge visited Kalash in Chitral during Pakistan visit1
The Royal Family

The Duke and Duchess were welcomed by the local people dressed in colourful attires. They presented the royal couple their traditional headwear and much to their joy William and Catherine immediately donned them.

Kensington Palace

The royal couple received such a vibrant and joyful welcome during their visit. ITV reporter Chris Ship described the community as, “The Kalash people are a non-Muslim minority population. In fact, their religion pre-dates Islam. They are culturally and ethnically distinct, descendants of Indo-Aryan tribes. This village was in Northern Pakistan in the Hindu Kush. Such a fascinating place the Kalash village in the Hindu Kush we went to today. Like a place you’ve never seen before – apart from a film set (or ⁦ @GameOfThrones⁩ ) and the most welcoming people…

Duke and Duchess of Cambridge visited Kalash in Chitral during Pakistan visit1
Kensington Palace

The colourful and vibrant visit gave the Duchess an opportunity to enjoy her one hobby that she really loves – photography. Catherine was seen carrying her camera in the area.

People reported, “The couple visited a village in the Chitral district on Wednesday, where Kate was spotted carrying her own camera. Kate has previously dubbed herself an “enthusiastic amateur photographer,” with her favourite subjects being her three children: Prince George, 6, Princess Charlotte, 4, and Prince Louis, 1. From birthday portraits to the first day of school photos, Kate has been documenting all of her family’s big moments for years.”

William and Catherine learned a few words of local language like hello that is “ishpata”.  Duchess also learned how to say thank you in Kalash language as she thanked the locals for all the colourful gifts. Another video from the Royal Family Channel.

Duke and Duchess of Cambridge visited Hindu Kush region in Chitral during Pakistan visit1
Kensington Palace

Coming to What Duchess wore- After 4 stunning appearances, today Catherine chose a casual look. She was wearing a combination of brown to visit the northwestern region. The look made the whole twitter community work really hard today.

Really Wild Clothing Shoot Nubuck Waistcoat
Really Wild Clothing Shoot Nubuck Waistcoat

Catherine wore her Really Wild Clothing Shoot Nubuck Waistcoat that she debuted during an ‘Expanding Horizons’ camp in June 2012.

EPA

Duchess paired the waistcoat with a brown full-sleeved shirt and taupe skirt paired with a new beige scarf and belt. The scarf was presented to her by the Hindu-kush region’s community early in the day.

Duchess of Cambridge wore brown shirt, taupe skirt, really wild clothing jacket ad shoes and Missoma earrings to Chitral visit in Pakistan
Kensington Palace

After great research work, Bojana finally cracked Duchess’ shirt. It is actually Mint Velvet Chocolate Utility Shirt Dress.

Duchess of Cambridge wore Mint Velvet Chocolate Utility Shirt Dress in Chitral Pakistan
Mint Velvet Chocolate Utility Shirt Dress

Woven with silk-like cupro for added drape, this chocolate-brown dress cut in a relaxed shirt silhouette that buttons down the front and has all the utilitarian details like buttoned epaulettes, cuff tabs and front flap pockets. I believe Duchess had the dress altered into a shirt.

Really Wild Spanish Boots in Chocolate Suede
Really Wild Spanish Boots in Chocolate Suede

Keeping the walking she will have to do today in mind, Duchess wore her Really Wild Spanish Boots in Chocolate Suede that is in her wardrobe since 2013.

Duchess of Cambridge wore Missoma Gold Zenyu Chandelier Hoops in Pakistan during hindu kush region visit
Missoma Gold Zenyu Chandelier Hoops

Duchess debuted another pair of earrings today. She was wearing Missoma Gold Zenyu Chandelier Hoops. Thanks to @emgcollins for the quick id. The $149 18Ct Gold plated earrings were described as, “The Zenyu Chandelier Hoops echo Colombia’s rich artistry and heritage with a modern edge. Bobble-trimmed charms are suspended from dainty hoops in a brushed-gold finish”.

The beige scarf Duchess carried was presented to her by the local scouts reflecting her association with UK scouts.

Court Circular noted an unannounced engagement of the day,

Their Royal Highnesses this evening received the Chief of Army Staff (General Qamar Javed Bajwa) and Mrs Qamar Bajwa at the Residence of the British High Commissioner in Islamabad.

Tomorrow, the Royal couple will spend day 4 of the visit in the vibrant and colourful city Lahore.

 

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Duke of Cambridge stole the evening in Sherwani while Duchess of Cambridge dazzled in Green Gown

Duchess of Cambridge wore green evening dress by Jenny Packahm to reception hosted by British High Commissioner during Pakistan visit

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After a busy day in Islamabad on the Day 2 of their royal tour and meetings with President and Prime Minister of Pakistan, the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge attended a reception hosted by the British High Commissioner Thomas Drew at the National Monument.

 

William and Catherine arrived in a specially painted tuk-tuk (Rikshaw) that was featured in the video shared by British High Commissioner Thomas Drew earlier this week. The reception is hosted to celebrate the very best of Pakistani music and culture, as well as highlighting the prosperous UK-Pakistan relationship.

Duke and Duchess of Cambridge attended a reception hosted by British High Commissioner to Pakistan during Pakistan visit
Kensington Palace Twitter

An interesting tidbit about the tuk-tuk.

Ahead of the reception, the royal couple toured the national Monument. The Pakistan Monument is a national monument and heritage museum located on the western Shakarparian Hills in Islamabad, Pakistan.

Duke and Duchess of Cambridge attended a reception hosted by British High Commissioner to Pakistan during Pakistan visit
Kensington Palace Instagram

A popular tourist destination, the monument was constructed to symbolize the unity of the Pakistani people. It is dedicated to the people of Pakistan who sacrificed their “today” for a better “tomorrow”. Its elevation makes the monument visible from across the Islamabad-Rawalpindi metropolitan area.

Duke and Duchess of Cambridge attended a reception hosted by the British High Commissioner to Pakistan at the Natioanl Monument in Islamabad
Wikipedia

Monument’s petal-shaped structure is derived from the traditional muqarnas of Mughal architecture. The four large petals represent each of the four cultures, the Punjabi, the Balochi, the Sindhi and the Pakhtun. The three smaller petals represent the minorities, Azad Kashmir and the tribal areas. All seven petals, though independent of each other, stand together in unison to form the nation of Pakistan. Standing together, they are protecting the star and the crescent of the flag of Pakistan. In 2005, the then-President Pervez Musharaf tasked Pakistan Council of Architects and Town Planners to organise a national monument design competition based around the theme of signifying strength, unity and dedication of the people of Pakistan into an icon representing an independent and free nation.

Duke and Duchess of Cambridge attended a reception hosted by the British High Commissioner to Pakistan at the Natioanl Monument in Islamabad
Wikipedia

From a total of 21 submissions, 3 were short-listed. The final design proposed by Arif Masoud was selected with his theme “We should learn from history but not remain in it.” Joining the monument is the Pakistan Monument Museum, which includes a wax museum depicting important events leading to the Pakistan Movement. From the air the monument looks like a star (centre) and a crescent moon (formed by walls forming the petals), these represent the star and crescent on Pakistan’s flag. The foundation stone was laid on 25 May 2004, completed in 2006 and inaugurated on 23 March 2007 by President General Pervez Musharaf.

 

Full text of Prince William’s Speech

Assalam O Alaikum. Thank you Tom for that kind introduction. Ladies and gentlemen, it is our great pleasure to join you here this evening on our first official visit to Pakistan.

Already, Catherine and I have been honoured by the hospitality you have shown us, and we have certainly managed to make our way through a record breaking amount of food so generously offered by our hosts….

I would like to begin by saying bahut shukria to you all for making us so welcome in your country.

Stood here with this magnificent monument behind me, I am struck by the great strides Pakistan has made since its birth seventy-two years ago. The view from this hill would have been quite different when my grandmother, The Queen, first visited over half a century ago.

Looking out, one would have seen the beginnings of a city under construction, yet to become the great capital that it is today. And with successive visits by my mother and my father, this view has continued to change, with the city constantly growing and with it my family’s affection for Pakistan.

This is the world’s sixth largest country by population. It has an unbelievably diverse geography that spans deserts to glaciers and everything in between. It is the birth place of the youngest ever Nobel Peace Prize winner. And I am told that it hosts not just the second highest mountain in the world, but also its highest cash machine!

It is also home to one of the youngest populations in the world, with an average age of just 24 – almost half that of the UK. In a public school not far from where we gather this evening, Catherine and I saw young children learning and playing, aided by an inspiring teacher, trained through the Teach for Pakistan programme.

We spoke with ambitious young women finishing their schooling and planning for university and work. As Muhammed Ali Jinnah said, “No struggle can ever succeed without women participating side by side with men”.

It was good to hear from President Alvi and Prime Minster Khan, earlier today that education will continue to be an important priority for Pakistan. We also saw the brilliant work taking place in the Margalla Hills, where young children were being taught the importance of protecting and caring for the world around them.

The education of Pakistan’s next generation will be the key that turns the country’s growing population into an engine of growth and helps unlock this country’s enormous potential. A rapidly growing population presents you with an enormous opportunity, but also significant challenge.

The UK and Pakistan share unique bonds and so it will always be in our best interests for you to succeed. Not least because of the 1.5 million people living in the UK with Pakistani origin and the fact that the UK is one of the biggest investors in your economy.

You can rely on us to keep playing an important role as a key partner and your friend. Delivering a future where Pakistan’s great potential can be realised will not be easy or without sacrifice.

For a country so young, Pakistan has endured many hardships, with countless lives lost to terror and hatred. Tonight I want to pay tribute to all those who have endured such sacrifice and helped to build the country that we see today.

Whether in Pakistan or the UK or elsewhere on our planet – we face shared global challenges. The effects of climate change threaten the present and the future – and therefore demand a concerted effort by everyone.

In Pakistan, your spectacular glaciers – and those of the wider Hindu Kush-Himalaya region – serve as a critical water store for a quarter of a billion people; and over 1.6 billion people rely on the great rivers that flow from the mountains in this part of the world.

Yet, because the effects of global warming at altitude, a one and a half degree Celsius temperature increase overall could mean warming of over two degrees Celsius for northern Pakistan’s highest mountains. This could lead to a loss of over a third of these vital glaciers in less than a century, with enormous impacts not only on the availability of water, but on agriculture and hydropower generation.

Tomorrow we will be seeing some of these impacts first hand and meeting some of the communities adjusting to the new realities and new challenges that climate change has brought to their towns and villages. I hope to learn what more we all can do to help prevent and mitigate this impending global catastrophe.

Ladies and gentlemen, given the scale and complexities of the challenges that future generations will face, it is clear that we all need to work together. And whether it’s this generation or the next, I know that the UK and Pakistan will continue to exemplify the very best in international cooperation.

Yes, the challenges ahead are great. But we cannot be daunted, nor distracted. Instead we should draw strength from our shared bonds and heed the words of Muhammed Ali Jinnah as we do so, “My message to you all” he said “is of hope, courage, and confidence”.

Thank you.

Embed from Getty Images

We usually talk about Catherine’s style and fashion choices, tonight it was Duke of Cambridge who gave a sartorial node to the hosts. Prince William looked dapper in a bespoke traditional attire ‘Sherwani’ designed by Naushemian.

Embed from Getty Images

For the colourful evening, Duchess of Cambridge stepped out in a stunning green evening gown and dupatta from British Designer Jenny Packham.

Duchess of Cambridge wore Jenny Packham Georgia Sequined Gown in green
Jenny Packham Georgia Sequined Gown

Katie on twitter suggested that Catherine might be wearing a bespoke gown based on this Jenny Packham Long-Sleeve Georgia Sequined Column Gown. The $3973 gown features round neckline, zip fastening, long sleeves and sequin embellishment.

Jenny Packham Georgia Sequined Gown

The gown was described on Harrods as, “Seen on the Autumn/Winter 2019 runway, the Georgia gown from coveted British label Jenny Packham exudes the timeless elegance and enchanting romance for which the brand is renowned. Fitted with a tailored waistline which is further accentuated with a row of crystals, the utterly feminine design is dripping in head-to-toe sequins, delivering an audacious amount of unapologetic glamour.”

Duchess of Cambridge wore Jimmy Choo Mimi 100 Platinum Metallic Nappa Leather Wrap Around Sandals at reception held in pakistan
Jimmy Choo Mimi 100 Platinum Metallic Nappa Leather Wrap Around Sandals

It looks like Catherine wore a new pair of sandals too. @dataduchess2 on Twitter suggested Catherine might be wearing Jimmy Choo Mimi 100 Platinum Metallic Nappa Leather Wrap Around Sandals.

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Duchess paired her outfit with a pair of statement earrings from O’Nitta. UFONoMore found that £290 bespoke earrings are gold plated with uncut crystal stones exclusively made for Duchess of Cambridge. They also found out that the Pakistani designer Maheen Khan is actually working in collaboration with O’Nitta and it looks like Catherine’s outfits and accessories were sourced through O’Nitta.

Tomorrow, William and Catherine will head to Lahore for a day full of engagements. They will reportedly visit SOS Village, A National Cricket Academy, Aitchison College, Shaukat Khanam Hospital and possibly Badshahi Mosque. The exact itinerary will be released in the morning.

 

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