The Duchess of Cambridge Hosted first Early Years Round Table

The Duchess of Cambridge hosted her first Roundtable with Health secretary Sajid Javid, family minister Will Quince, representatives from the early years' sector
Kensington Royal

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The Duchess of Cambridge hosted her first Roundtable with Health secretary Sajid Javid, family minister Will Quince, representatives from the early years’ sector, and officials from the Department for Education and the Department of Health and Social Care. The Duchess of Cambridge’s first Round-table with the Government Ministers also marks the first anniversary of her The Royal Foundation Centre’s first anniversary.

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Since her marriage in 2011, The Duchess has been working publicly and behind the scene to bring the importance of Early Years to the mainstream and is committed to raising awareness of the importance of Early childhood experiences and of collaborative action to improve outcomes across society.

The foundation of The Royal Centre for Early Childhood in June 2021 marked a big milestone preceded by the groundbreaking ‘5 Big Question survey’ in 2020. The center focuses on raising awareness of the importance of Early childhood experiences in shaping society’s long-term health, well-being, and happiness.

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We have been seeing many private meetings for a few months in court circulars regarding early years and today we found out that The Royal center for Ealy Childhood had marked another big milestone this summer. Find out all the work Catherine has been doing in the field here.

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Earlier this year, the project took The Duchess of Cambridge to Denmark to learn more about the country’s world-leading approach to early childhood. It has been scientifically proven that the hardest social challenges that our society is facing today have their roots in the earliest years of a person’s life.

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The center has commissioned IPSO for a research based on the ‘5 Big Questions’ survey to delve deeper into public perceptions of early childhood, focusing on the prioritization of early years, the link between the first five years of life and lifelong outcomes such as mental health and well being and the supporting parent seek when raising young children.

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The research focused on three key areas:

  • The Prioritisation of Early Years
  • The link between the first five years of life and lifelong outcomes for mental health
  • Wellbeing and support parents seek when raising young children

 

 

 

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Centre for Early Childhood

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The new findings show that nine in 10 (91%) agree that early years are important in shaping children’s lives, although less than a fifth (17%) recognize the unique importance of children’s development from birth to the age of five. The poll of 4,682 adults found that more than half (55%) recognize that future mental health is the most likely part of adult life to be affected by early years’ experience. The full report is available here.

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From Dailymail’s report,

Kelly Beaver, chief executive of Ipsos UK and Ireland, which carried out the polling of over 4,000 UK adults from April 21 to May 5, added: ‘Although the majority of us agree that the experiences people have in childhood can have a significant impact on their future, a minority of Britons recognise the unique importance of the first five years of a child’s life.

‘These formative years are crucial in the emotional, social and physical development of every child and this critical new research, for The Royal Foundation Centre for Early Childhood, provides the opportunity for society to ignite a discussion about how parents and children can be better supported during this period.’

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Today’s roundtable was focused on the forthcoming research and bringing the Government support to make the Early year’s a crucial agenda of public welfare. The findings were analyzed by the Duchess, Mr. Javid, Will Quince, the families minister, representatives from the early year’s sector, and officials from the Department for Education and the Department of Health and Social Care at the Royal Institution in central London.

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Speaking at the Roundtable, The Duchess of Cambridge said,

Our experiences in early childhood fundamentally impact our whole life and set the foundation for how we go on to thrive as individuals, with one another, as a community, and as a society. The findings published today present us with a huge opportunity and demonstrate there is a real appetite from the public to bring this issue up on all of our agendas.

There is more we can all do – every member of society can play a key role, whether that is direct with a child or by investing in the adults around them – the parents, the carers, the early year workforce, and more. If we come together to raise the importance of early childhood development, we’ll soon see that healthy, happy individuals make for a healthier, happier world. Which is why every second we spend with a child is an investment in our collective future.

The Duchess of Cambridge hosted her first Roundtable with Health secretary Sajid Javid, family minister Will Quince, representatives from the early years' sector
Kensington Royal
The Duchess of Cambridge hosted her first Roundtable with Health secretary Sajid Javid, family minister Will Quince, representatives from the early years' sector
Kensington Royal

The new research shows that informal groups are the key source of support for parents, with more than half of parents of children aged 0 to five stating their family or friends were the best sources of information on their child’s emotional and social development. Despite all of this, parents are still more likely to seek out information and advice on their child’s physical health than they are on their social or emotional development, with 35 percent asking for advice on nutrition, while just 21 percent seek advice on the development of social skills.

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The Duchess of Cambridge is wearing a pink Alexander McQueen suit.

The Duchess of Cambridge wore Alexander McQueen Wool Blazer and Trouser
Alexander McQueen Wool Blazer and Trouser

The suit consisting of a wool blazer and matching trousers was from the label’s 2022 collection. Thanks to Georgiesmum on Twitter for the id.

 

The Duchess of Cambridge is wearing a pink Alexander McQueen suit
Kensington Royal

She paired the outfit with a white top.

The Duchess of Cambridge wore Emmy London Rebecca Makeup Pumps
Emmy London Rebecca Makeup Pumps

The Duchess of Cambridge was wearing her Emmy London Rebecca Makeup Pumps.

The Duchess of Cambridge Mappin & Webb Empress earrings
Mappin & Webb Empress earrings

Her Mappin & Webb Empress Earrings and

Mappin & Webb Empress Diamond Pendant Necklace
Mappin & Webb Empress Diamond Pendant Necklace

Mappin & Webb Empress Diamond Pendant Necklace were complimenting the look.

The Duchess of Cambridge was carrying Smythson A4 Writing Folder with Zip
Smythson A4 Writing Folder with Zip

Catherine carried a navy Smythson A4 Writing Folder with zipping. Thanks to Kate’s closet for the id.

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